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Friday, November 9, 2012

Happy 8th Birthday, Firefox!

very happy 8th birth day to Firefox ... only SEO person know the importance of Firefox in their work place ... we really happy to have you in our system FireFox ... you are the ultimate invention ... none can replace you for our work ... Thanks and Congratz on your 8th Birthday ....


Happy Birthday FireFox

Thursday, October 18, 2012

Small Request to Kejrival

ఏమండి కేజ్రివాల్ గారు ... మీరేమో ఎవరో ఒకరిమీద బురద చల్లడం ... ఈ వెధవ టీవీ చానెళ్ళ వాళ్ళు కొందరు పనికి మాలిన ... వెధవలను కూర్చోబెట్టి ఇంక ఏ విషయము లేనట్టు దాని గురుంచి ఒక గంట చర్చించడం తర్వాత వదిలెయ్యడం ...

Aravind Kejrival

మీరు వెంట వెంటనే అందరి పైన కాకుండా .. ఒక్కొక్కళ్ళ భాగోతాలు బయటపెట్టి శిక్ష పడ్డాక వేరే వాళ్ళ పైకి వెళ్ళాలి ... మొన్న వాద్రా అన్నారు .... దాని పైన ఎటువంటిది తేలకముందే సల్మాన్ ఖుర్షిద్ పైన ఆరోపణలు .... అదీ ఎటు తేలక ముందే గట్కరి పైనా ఆరోపణలు ... అంటే మీరు కేవలం ఆరోపణలు చేసి వదిలేస్తే నిజం బైట పడుతుందా ?

దుర్మార్గులకు లంచాగొండులకు అవినీతిపరులకు శిక్ష పడుతుందా ??? కొంచం ఆలోచించండి ... ఒక పక్క ప్రణాళిక అంటూ లేకుండా ఇష్టం వచ్చినట్టు వెళ్ళిపోతున్నారు ... జాగ్రత్త ...

ఇవన్ని ఇలాగె కొనసాగితే చివరికి మాకు మీ మీద కూడా నమ్మకం పోతుంది ... ఆరోపణ చెయ్యడం ... బురద చల్లడం ఈజీ ... దాన్ని నిరూపించడం కష్టం ... అది నిరూపించి శభాష్ అనిపించుకోండి ... ఈ అవినీతి రాజకీయ నాయకుల భరతం పట్టండి .... 

Sunday, August 12, 2012

India Ends London Campaign with Silver

 India end its London Olympic campaign with Silver thanks to Sushil for the silver medal in 66kg Free style wrestling. Indian Medal tally is 6 2-silver and 4 bronze. This is the highest count of medals for India in all Olympics in which India participated ( as per my knowledge ). We Indians should thank all the participants from India who ever participated and worked hard to get medals to India. Guyz we are really proud of you, we really really proud of you and we salute you.....  Here the images of Medal winners










Hats-off to you all ...

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

Error Prefix not found - Unable to install ubuntu 12.04 LTS 64 bit

Hi Friends I am using 32bit Ubuntu 12.04 LTS ( Long Term Support ) on my laptop Lenovo B570E. My Lappy Configuration is Intel® Core™ i3-2350M CPU @ 2.30GHz × 4 , 4gb ram, 500gb HD. Few Days back when I was checking information about my processor in intel site .... I came to know that my Processor is 64 bit. Then I went to ubuntu site and checked the download page and it has 64 bit OS.

Without any second thought I have downloaded that 64bit version and burned it onto CD and tried to install on my laptop as we can not upgrade an OS from 32 bit to 64 bit .. we have to do fresh installation. When I restarted my lappy and went to boot options and selected from DVD .. it gave an error message which says " Error: Prefix Not Set " and soon after this message some weird screen appears with some juggy vertical lines and some shit crap.... I had to shutdown the system forcibly. Some where I read that it might be the problem with the size of ISO image of the OS ... So I bought a DVD and Burned that image to DVD and tried with and got the same error. Tried 4 5 times still the same problem ...

Then I raised this issue in askubuntu.com, ubuntuforums.org and even in launchpad.net ... none gave any solution ... @ launchpad.net Andrew tried to solve but it dint work with me ... Thanks Andrew for trying to help me...

Then I found that there is a cyclic reference folder " ubuntu " which is a shortcut is there in that ISO image file. when I tried to open that folder is showing the all folders which are in ISO main folder ...

So I decided to remove that ubuntu reference from ISO file. I searched ubuntu software centre I found ISOMaster which will help us to edit ISO images. check the below image .....



and also the ubuntu link which is highlighted ....

Here is what you have to do....

Just open ISO Master and browse the folder which has your ISO Image and select it ... once the ISO selected ( I have downloaded DVD Version ) click on it  .. the files will be shown in below space ... click on ubuntu and click remove ... then press ctrls+S to save ... select other location to save as it cant overwrite the ISO image ... and save it...

Then burn that image to DVD ( if you download the DVD version ) or to CD ( if you downloaded the CD version ) as slow as possible, it increases the compatibility, especially with media you intended to boot to.

Now Try Boot from the CD / DVD. It worked for me ... Hope it will work for you also ... ALL THE BEST ...








Monday, July 2, 2012

Rel Canonical: Impact on Analytics

Ever since Google, Bing, and Yahoo! joined forces to implement the canonical tag as a bandage for duplicate content issues, there has been a lot of debate in the SEO world about its usage. Many experts feel that it is too easy to be used improperly, so much so that webmasters are going to screw up entire websites with it.

While I have not yet been convinced that it should be shunned, banned, and outcast - I feel that it is hardly ever the best solution. At best, it is a Band-Aid. It won't heal wounds. It won't prevent wounds from occurring. But it is a quick fix that can certainly help some situations. Lindsay Wassell wrote a Complete Guide to Rel Canonical that covers nearly everything you need to know about the canonical tag.

There is one topic that relates to the canonical tag that no one is talking about yet.

It's impact on Google Analytics.

I'm a numbers guy by nature. I check various stats in Analytics every day. I'm always looking for new ways to look at the numbers and new ways to figure out what they're telling me. Yes, they talk to me on occasion.

The rel canonical tag screws up your Analytics data in a big way.

Let's start at the basics. You clearly have issues with duplicate content. On large sites, that is nearly impossible to avoid. Even the best of Content Management Systems doesn't solve every issue. At some point either you or some other website links to a page that exists in two places. For all the reasons pointed out in articles above, you need to fix this. Should I use a 301 redirect, or the rel canonical tag?

Using the canonical tag is a Band-Aid, remember? It doesn't fix the issue. Sure, the search engines might use it to figure out that they are the same page and rank only 1 of them so you're not competing with yourself. You stopped the bleeding. Even though you used the tag, two distinct pages still exist. Since both are linked to from somewhere on the Internet, visitors will be visiting two different pages.

This means your Analytics data is splitting the data between pages. It doesn't realize that they are the same page. It can't read the canonical tag.
Let's take a look at it. I work on e-commerce websites. This is where duplicate content has been a huge issue for years. Sometimes a product sits in two different categories, like a tomato being both a fruit and a vegetable. (What's the consensus these days?) Ecommerce platforms like to know how visitors found the content, so that leads to:

myfreshproducestore.com/vegetables/tomato.html
and
myfreshproducestore.com/fruits/tomato.html

The tomato.html page is the same, just found in two different URLs. It should be noted that many of the most popular e-commerce platforms have solved this issue by not using URL path tracking. The custom platform all of our clients live on is still a little antiquated and hasn't fixed this issue yet. Out of 11 different sites on the platform that I checked, roughly 35% of the pages are duplicates. On 1 ecommerce shoe store, 78% of the pages were duplicates. Yep, that means on average each page has 5 different instances.

So why does rel canonical fall short? Take a look at the Analytics data:

rel canonical not the solution

Each of our product pages has a specific system number. In this case, p2 sits at 37 different URLs! Obviously, this is an extreme case, but it's equally important in the tomato situation where it resides at only 2 locations.

When I want to go look at page specific data, I can't just look at 1 URL. In this case, I have to look at 37. With the tomatoes, I have to look at 2 still. I can't take a quick gander at p2 and say, "oh, I need to do this…"

Of Long Tails and Landing Pages
One of the ways I look at long-tail traffic is through total number of keywords bringing traffic and total number of landing pages. Rand has also at times recommended this approach for discovering better indexation numbers. Look at how not fixing the real issue behind duplicate content can screw up that data:

solve duplicate content issues

The problem with that 2,792 number? There are only 500 products on the site and fewer than 100 category pages. How do I know which products are actually being indexed? Is Google indexing the same 400 products 7 times each and ignoring 100 of them?





If I dig down deep enough, crunch enough numbers, and dig through enough data I might be able to figure this out. If we had this duplicate content issue fixed it would be easy as pumpkin pie to tell if there is a problem.

In this case, canonical tags have not solved the problem. We started using them 3 months ago (after a lot of schmoozing of the tech department), and our landing page numbers are still absurdly high. This means Google is still not entirely able to figure out whether or not a tomato is a fruit or a vegetable or both.

Clearly, in our case the root of the problem is with our platform. Implementing canonical tags has seemingly reduced the number of indexed pages by about 25%. Whoever thought we'd be hoping for fewer pages indexed? Dr. Pete's case study shows that the canonical tag does work, at least when you don't want it to. It is a temporary fix, a band-aid. To solve our duplicate content problems we need to fix our platform and use 301 redirects on all the duplicate pages.

That would mean no more looking at 37 unique URLs to figure out the bounce rate of 1 product page.
No more spreading out short and long-tail keywords over 2800 pages instead of 600.

The rel canonical tag creates major issues with Google Analytics. It should not be your solution to duplicate content issues.


Source: http://www.seomoz.org/ugc/rel-canonical-is-just-a-bandaid

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

How to find Facebook Profile/Page ID after changing it to UserName?

Many of us will be asked to provide our Facebook Profile or Page ID Numbers in some sites where we try to promote our pages or profiles. In some forums, networks ask us to provide the ID number instead of usernmae. So if we change our profile or page id to UserName how can we give them the ID number? Dont worry we have a solution for that. Just go to the address bar of browser and type this

http://graph.facebook.com/<username> or https://graph.facebook.com/<username>

and you will get your profile or page Id Number. In the Place of <username> give your username.

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Blogs VS Forums


Blogs and Forums Both powerful ways to build a loyal readership and repeat traffic to your site. While the underlying technology behind forums and blogs is virtually the same, each implementation is very much unique.

Blogs = I speak, you listen

Blogs are a "one-to-many" medium, with the website owner writing the majority of the posts, allowing users to submit comments.

Blogs are often created to build authority in your niche, demonstrating your wealth of experience and knowledge in the target area.

Things to consider: Since you, as the website owner, will be required to submit posts on a regular basis to keep the blog lively and keep visitors coming, it is important to choose a topic close to heart and plan on allocating a certain number of hours every day/week for writing new posts.

Ghostwriters and filler posts don't work well in a blog environment. "Your voice" needs to remain consistent as you continually strive to keep your readers eagerly expecting your next post.

Blogs are often personal, whereby the owner will identify by name, post pictures illustrating his/her experiences and brand him/her self as a top authority in the field.

Forums = Collaborate with others

Forums are a "many-to-many" medium, where individuals sharing passion for the same topic, discuss among each other, posting public posts, replying to each other and sharing information.

Forums are created around a specific niche, in an attempt to build a high number of members who will communicate with each other and keep the forum active.

In a typical forum, you'll have 10% of the members engaging in 100% of the discussions, with the remaining 90% "lurking", reading messages but not posting any new information.

Things to consider: Once you achieve a critical-mass of posts and members in a community, a snow-ball effect will help in continually growing the forum

, with your primary job duty being keeping things under control - deleting spam posts and banning aggressive members.

From an SEO perspective, forums are usually better traffic-generation tools. The high number of posts (each post being a complete HTML page), lends itself to a higher number of indexed pages and more organic traffic. Blogs are good tools providing you can position yourself as an industry leader and secure a loyal readership.


Similarities

With both blogs and forums, you can post a comment and reply to other comments, thus developing discussions. In both cases, you can leave comments which may or may not be moderated and you may have to identify yourself with a name and email address.

Differences

There are many differences and have been summarized in the chart below. 

 ForumsBlogs
Main purposeCreates a discussion on a particular topic by allowing commenting of posts.Posting or the content is the main purpose, not the commenting.
Discussion requires many participantsYes - forums are created for discussion between several people.No - mainly designed for a single user input.
Control of content (Authoring of New Topics)Decentralized, group.
All members usually have the ability to create new topics.
Allows for more emergent and unpredictable directions that may reflect the group's desires as a whole.
Centralized, personal.
New topics being presented by a defined and focused person or small group.
FocusMore unfocused - many contributors contributing user-generated topics (a wider variety of content) with differing viewpoints.
Forums tend to create much more content, and will pull in traffic on topics or phrases that never occurred to you.
More focused as blogs are written and edited by a single author (or a small group).
Replies tend to be directed more to the primary author.
IntentGroup input, decision making, collaboration.
Accumulates group input and facilitates collaboration and group decision making.
Personal accounts, news, reflection.
Trusted individuals provide accounts of events and information.
Chronology
(order and presentation of topics)
Posting of replies can govern the presentation of the originating topic.
Topics with new replies are often presented at the top (but not always).
Most recently posted topics at the top of the page, regardless of new comments.
Content organization
(How topics are archived and organized)
Discussions often presented in multiple places across the online community and are archived independently.
The member chooses the appropriate location to post a new topic, depending on subject matter.
Creates multiple “front pages”, spreading the presentation of new topics across different locations in the community.
Topics are all presented on the weblog front page and then archived into categories.
Each new topic is assigned to a category that is used to organize the topics for future reference.
Message lengthMany short messages.Used more for posting longer messages.
Responses“replies”
Participation is explicitly requested by the poster. A discussion is not a discussion without a reply.
“comments”
The author does not need further participation to reach a goal - comment if you want.
Personal connectionsBroader look at a larger number of members as they interact with one another in a group setting.Can allow online community members to develop personal connections with the webloggers relatively quickly.
Log inYesNo
Registration requiredYesNo
Communicate directly with other forum members online through private messaging.YesNo
Show who's online at a given timeYesNo
Provide statistical info, eg, how many comments posted over what period of time.YesNo
Notification whenever new or updated content is postedNoYes
Pollution Control
(off-topic or inappropriate topics (or responses) 
Must be managed closely to deal withspam or flames (see definitions below).
Not able to turn off replies, but do prevent problems with moderation of each new topic or response.
Can be unspammable or unflame-able by others without loss of primary value.
Can turn-off comments.
Ability to syndicate (republishing content from one site to another) content to anyone who wants to receive it .No, content is more “private”Yes, your content can appear on other blogs
Tools
(see definitions below)
Most forums have not integrated tools used in blogsability to read and link weblogs together. They include: Trackback,RSS, Aggregation, Permalinking, Cross linking

Definitions

Trackback

A system by which another website (usually another blog) is notified that their site has linked to it (usually within an article being posted). The objective is to notify the subject of an article that they have been mentioned in another article elsewhere. It allows a blogger to see who has seen the original post and has written another entry concerning it.

RSS

RSS is a web content syndication format. The acronym stands for Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication. An RSS file (or “RSS feed”) is a text file that usually contains details about the most recent entries on a website. It doesn’t have any information about colours, fonts, layout, or any other graphical issues. It’s simply text in a standardised format. The purpose of RSS is to makes it easy for one website to include a list of headlines from another, a process known as “syndication.” The second use for an RSS file is so people can read entries, or parts of entries, in an RSS news reader. These are programs you run on your computer. You tell it the addresses of RSS files you are interested in and it downloads them. The program then displays the entry headlines, and maybe their content, regularly fetching the latest version of the RSS file. People use RSS news readers if they like to read lots of weblogs or news sites because it makes the process much quicker — the person no longer has to visit each site in turn, the latest entries are fetched automatically, and the lack of graphics makes the process much quicker. You can read more about RSS at www.webreference.com.

Aggregation


An aggregator is a desktop or a Web application that can read and display several feeds in a single interface.

Permalinking

A link to a specific article in the archives of a blog, which will remain valid after the article is no longer listed on the blog's front page (i.e after it has archived).

Spam

'Spam' is unsolicited online messages generally of a commercial nature, usually delivered as e-mail (i.e. virtual junk mail). Comment spam however is when someone posts off-topic commercial remarks with links in a blog's comment section.

Flaming

To 'flame' someone is to make a hostile intemperate remark, usually of a personal nature. A hostile exchange of views via the Internet characterised by highly intemperate language.


Source:- http://ezinearticles.com/?Forums-vs-Blogs&id=415052 and http://www.suestudios.com/articles/article23.htm

Complete List of Status Codes Definitions


10 Status Code Definitions

Each Status-Code is described below, including a description of which method(s) it can follow and any metainformation required in the response.

10.1 Informational 1xx

This class of status code indicates a provisional response, consisting only of the Status-Line and optional headers, and is terminated by an empty line. There are no required headers for this class of status code. Since HTTP/1.0 did not define any 1xx status codes, servers MUST NOT send a 1xx response to an HTTP/1.0 client except under experimental conditions.
A client MUST be prepared to accept one or more 1xx status responses prior to a regular response, even if the client does not expect a 100 (Continue) status message. Unexpected 1xx status responses MAY be ignored by a user agent.
Proxies MUST forward 1xx responses, unless the connection between the proxy and its client has been closed, or unless the proxy itself requested the generation of the 1xx response. (For example, if a
proxy adds a "Expect: 100-continue" field when it forwards a request, then it need not forward the corresponding 100 (Continue) response(s).)

10.1.1 100 Continue

The client SHOULD continue with its request. This interim response is used to inform the client that the initial part of the request has been received and has not yet been rejected by the server. The client SHOULD continue by sending the remainder of the request or, if the request has already been completed, ignore this response. The server MUST send a final response after the request has been completed. See section 8.2.3 for detailed discussion of the use and handling of this status code.

10.1.2 101 Switching Protocols

The server understands and is willing to comply with the client's request, via the Upgrade message header field (section 14.42), for a change in the application protocol being used on this connection. The server will switch protocols to those defined by the response's Upgrade header field immediately after the empty line which terminates the 101 response.
The protocol SHOULD be switched only when it is advantageous to do so. For example, switching to a newer version of HTTP is advantageous over older versions, and switching to a real-time, synchronous protocol might be advantageous when delivering resources that use such features.

10.2 Successful 2xx

This class of status code indicates that the client's request was successfully received, understood, and accepted.

10.2.1 200 OK

The request has succeeded. The information returned with the response is dependent on the method used in the request, for example:
GET an entity corresponding to the requested resource is sent in the response;
HEAD the entity-header fields corresponding to the requested resource are sent in the response without any message-body;
POST an entity describing or containing the result of the action;
TRACE an entity containing the request message as received by the end server.

10.2.2 201 Created

The request has been fulfilled and resulted in a new resource being created. The newly created resource can be referenced by the URI(s) returned in the entity of the response, with the most specific URI for the resource given by a Location header field. The response SHOULD include an entity containing a list of resource characteristics and location(s) from which the user or user agent can choose the one most appropriate. The entity format is specified by the media type given in the Content-Type header field. The origin server MUST create the resource before returning the 201 status code. If the action cannot be carried out immediately, the server SHOULD respond with 202 (Accepted) response instead.
A 201 response MAY contain an ETag response header field indicating the current value of the entity tag for the requested variant just created, see section 14.19.

10.2.3 202 Accepted

The request has been accepted for processing, but the processing has not been completed. The request might or might not eventually be acted upon, as it might be disallowed when processing actually takes place. There is no facility for re-sending a status code from an asynchronous operation such as this.
The 202 response is intentionally non-committal. Its purpose is to allow a server to accept a request for some other process (perhaps a batch-oriented process that is only run once per day) without requiring that the user agent's connection to the server persist until the process is completed. The entity returned with this response SHOULD include an indication of the request's current status and either a pointer to a status monitor or some estimate of when the user can expect the request to be fulfilled.

10.2.4 203 Non-Authoritative Information

The returned metainformation in the entity-header is not the definitive set as available from the origin server, but is gathered from a local or a third-party copy. The set presented MAY be a subset or superset of the original version. For example, including local annotation information about the resource might result in a superset of the metainformation known by the origin server. Use of this response code is not required and is only appropriate when the response would otherwise be 200 (OK).

10.2.5 204 No Content

The server has fulfilled the request but does not need to return an entity-body, and might want to return updated metainformation. The response MAY include new or updated metainformation in the form of entity-headers, which if present SHOULD be associated with the requested variant.
If the client is a user agent, it SHOULD NOT change its document view from that which caused the request to be sent. This response is primarily intended to allow input for actions to take place without causing a change to the user agent's active document view, although any new or updated metainformation SHOULD be applied to the document currently in the user agent's active view.
The 204 response MUST NOT include a message-body, and thus is always terminated by the first empty line after the header fields.

10.2.6 205 Reset Content

The server has fulfilled the request and the user agent SHOULD reset the document view which caused the request to be sent. This response is primarily intended to allow input for actions to take place via user input, followed by a clearing of the form in which the input is given so that the user can easily initiate another input action. The response MUST NOT include an entity.

10.2.7 206 Partial Content

The server has fulfilled the partial GET request for the resource. The request MUST have included a Range header field (section 14.35) indicating the desired range, and MAY have included an If-Range header field (section 14.27) to make the request conditional.
The response MUST include the following header fields:
      - Either a Content-Range header field (section 14.16) indicating
        the range included with this response, or a multipart/byteranges
        Content-Type including Content-Range fields for each part. If a
        Content-Length header field is present in the response, its
        value MUST match the actual number of OCTETs transmitted in the
        message-body.
      - Date
      - ETag and/or Content-Location, if the header would have been sent
        in a 200 response to the same request
      - Expires, Cache-Control, and/or Vary, if the field-value might
        differ from that sent in any previous response for the same
        variant
If the 206 response is the result of an If-Range request that used a strong cache validator (see section 13.3.3), the response SHOULD NOT include other entity-headers. If the response is the result of an If-Range request that used a weak validator, the response MUST NOT include other entity-headers; this prevents inconsistencies between cached entity-bodies and updated headers. Otherwise, the response MUST include all of the entity-headers that would have been returned with a 200 (OK) response to the same request.
A cache MUST NOT combine a 206 response with other previously cached content if the ETag or Last-Modified headers do not match exactly, see 13.5.4.
A cache that does not support the Range and Content-Range headers MUST NOT cache 206 (Partial) responses.

10.3 Redirection 3xx

This class of status code indicates that further action needs to be taken by the user agent in order to fulfill the request. The action required MAY be carried out by the user agent without interaction with the user if and only if the method used in the second request is GET or HEAD. A client SHOULD detect infinite redirection loops, since such loops generate network traffic for each redirection.
      Note: previous versions of this specification recommended a
      maximum of five redirections. Content developers should be aware
      that there might be clients that implement such a fixed
      limitation.

10.3.1 300 Multiple Choices

The requested resource corresponds to any one of a set of representations, each with its own specific location, and agent- driven negotiation information (section 12) is being provided so that the user (or user agent) can select a preferred representation and redirect its request to that location.
Unless it was a HEAD request, the response SHOULD include an entity containing a list of resource characteristics and location(s) from which the user or user agent can choose the one most appropriate. The entity format is specified by the media type given in the Content- Type header field. Depending upon the format and the capabilities of
the user agent, selection of the most appropriate choice MAY be performed automatically. However, this specification does not define any standard for such automatic selection.
If the server has a preferred choice of representation, it SHOULD include the specific URI for that representation in the Location field; user agents MAY use the Location field value for automatic redirection. This response is cacheable unless indicated otherwise.

10.3.2 301 Moved Permanently

The requested resource has been assigned a new permanent URI and any future references to this resource SHOULD use one of the returned URIs. Clients with link editing capabilities ought to automatically re-link references to the Request-URI to one or more of the new references returned by the server, where possible. This response is cacheable unless indicated otherwise.
The new permanent URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s).
If the 301 status code is received in response to a request other than GET or HEAD, the user agent MUST NOT automatically redirect the request unless it can be confirmed by the user, since this might change the conditions under which the request was issued.
      Note: When automatically redirecting a POST request after
      receiving a 301 status code, some existing HTTP/1.0 user agents
      will erroneously change it into a GET request.

10.3.3 302 Found

The requested resource resides temporarily under a different URI. Since the redirection might be altered on occasion, the client SHOULD continue to use the Request-URI for future requests. This response is only cacheable if indicated by a Cache-Control or Expires header field.
The temporary URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s).
If the 302 status code is received in response to a request other than GET or HEAD, the user agent MUST NOT automatically redirect the request unless it can be confirmed by the user, since this might change the conditions under which the request was issued.
      Note: RFC 1945 and RFC 2068 specify that the client is not allowed
      to change the method on the redirected request.  However, most
      existing user agent implementations treat 302 as if it were a 303
      response, performing a GET on the Location field-value regardless
      of the original request method. The status codes 303 and 307 have
      been added for servers that wish to make unambiguously clear which
      kind of reaction is expected of the client.

10.3.4 303 See Other

The response to the request can be found under a different URI and SHOULD be retrieved using a GET method on that resource. This method exists primarily to allow the output of a POST-activated script to redirect the user agent to a selected resource. The new URI is not a substitute reference for the originally requested resource. The 303 response MUST NOT be cached, but the response to the second (redirected) request might be cacheable.
The different URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s).
      Note: Many pre-HTTP/1.1 user agents do not understand the 303
      status. When interoperability with such clients is a concern, the
      302 status code may be used instead, since most user agents react
      to a 302 response as described here for 303.

10.3.5 304 Not Modified

If the client has performed a conditional GET request and access is allowed, but the document has not been modified, the server SHOULD respond with this status code. The 304 response MUST NOT contain a message-body, and thus is always terminated by the first empty line after the header fields.
The response MUST include the following header fields:
      - Date, unless its omission is required by section 14.18.1
If a clockless origin server obeys these rules, and proxies and clients add their own Date to any response received without one (as already specified by [RFC 2068], section 14.19), caches will operate correctly.
      - ETag and/or Content-Location, if the header would have been sent
        in a 200 response to the same request
      - Expires, Cache-Control, and/or Vary, if the field-value might
        differ from that sent in any previous response for the same
        variant
If the conditional GET used a strong cache validator (see section 13.3.3), the response SHOULD NOT include other entity-headers. Otherwise (i.e., the conditional GET used a weak validator), the response MUST NOT include other entity-headers; this prevents inconsistencies between cached entity-bodies and updated headers.
If a 304 response indicates an entity not currently cached, then the cache MUST disregard the response and repeat the request without the conditional.
If a cache uses a received 304 response to update a cache entry, the cache MUST update the entry to reflect any new field values given in the response.

10.3.6 305 Use Proxy

The requested resource MUST be accessed through the proxy given by the Location field. The Location field gives the URI of the proxy. The recipient is expected to repeat this single request via the proxy. 305 responses MUST only be generated by origin servers.
      Note: RFC 2068 was not clear that 305 was intended to redirect a
      single request, and to be generated by origin servers only.  Not
      observing these limitations has significant security consequences.

10.3.7 306 (Unused)

The 306 status code was used in a previous version of the specification, is no longer used, and the code is reserved.

10.3.8 307 Temporary Redirect

The requested resource resides temporarily under a different URI. Since the redirection MAY be altered on occasion, the client SHOULD continue to use the Request-URI for future requests. This response is only cacheable if indicated by a Cache-Control or Expires header field.
The temporary URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s) , since many pre-HTTP/1.1 user agents do not understand the 307 status. Therefore, the note SHOULD contain the information necessary for a user to repeat the original request on the new URI.
If the 307 status code is received in response to a request other than GET or HEAD, the user agent MUST NOT automatically redirect the request unless it can be confirmed by the user, since this might change the conditions under which the request was issued.

10.4 Client Error 4xx

The 4xx class of status code is intended for cases in which the client seems to have erred. Except when responding to a HEAD request, the server SHOULD include an entity containing an explanation of the error situation, and whether it is a temporary or permanent condition. These status codes are applicable to any request method. User agents SHOULD display any included entity to the user.
If the client is sending data, a server implementation using TCP SHOULD be careful to ensure that the client acknowledges receipt of the packet(s) containing the response, before the server closes the input connection. If the client continues sending data to the server after the close, the server's TCP stack will send a reset packet to the client, which may erase the client's unacknowledged input buffers before they can be read and interpreted by the HTTP application.

10.4.1 400 Bad Request

The request could not be understood by the server due to malformed syntax. The client SHOULD NOT repeat the request without modifications.

10.4.2 401 Unauthorized

The request requires user authentication. The response MUST include a WWW-Authenticate header field (section 14.47) containing a challenge applicable to the requested resource. The client MAY repeat the request with a suitable Authorization header field (section 14.8). If the request already included Authorization credentials, then the 401 response indicates that authorization has been refused for those credentials. If the 401 response contains the same challenge as the prior response, and the user agent has already attempted authentication at least once, then the user SHOULD be presented the entity that was given in the response, since that entity might include relevant diagnostic information. HTTP access authentication is explained in "HTTP Authentication: Basic and Digest Access Authentication"[43].

10.4.3 402 Payment Required

This code is reserved for future use.

10.4.4 403 Forbidden

The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it. Authorization will not help and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated. If the request method was not HEAD and the server wishes to make public why the request has not been fulfilled, it SHOULD describe the reason for the refusal in the entity. If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 404 (Not Found) can be used instead.

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address. This status code is commonly used when the server does not wish to reveal exactly why the request has been refused, or when no other response is applicable.

10.4.6 405 Method Not Allowed

The method specified in the Request-Line is not allowed for the resource identified by the Request-URI. The response MUST include an Allow header containing a list of valid methods for the requested resource.

10.4.7 406 Not Acceptable

The resource identified by the request is only capable of generating response entities which have content characteristics not acceptable according to the accept headers sent in the request.
Unless it was a HEAD request, the response SHOULD include an entity containing a list of available entity characteristics and location(s) from which the user or user agent can choose the one most appropriate. The entity format is specified by the media type given in the Content-Type header field. Depending upon the format and the capabilities of the user agent, selection of the most appropriate choice MAY be performed automatically. However, this specification does not define any standard for such automatic selection.
      Note: HTTP/1.1 servers are allowed to return responses which are
      not acceptable according to the accept headers sent in the
      request. In some cases, this may even be preferable to sending a
      406 response. User agents are encouraged to inspect the headers of
      an incoming response to determine if it is acceptable.
If the response could be unacceptable, a user agent SHOULD temporarily stop receipt of more data and query the user for a decision on further actions.

10.4.8 407 Proxy Authentication Required

This code is similar to 401 (Unauthorized), but indicates that the client must first authenticate itself with the proxy. The proxy MUST return a Proxy-Authenticate header field (section 14.33) containing a challenge applicable to the proxy for the requested resource. The client MAY repeat the request with a suitable Proxy-Authorization header field (section 14.34). HTTP access authentication is explained in "HTTP Authentication: Basic and Digest Access Authentication" [43].

10.4.9 408 Request Timeout

The client did not produce a request within the time that the server was prepared to wait. The client MAY repeat the request without modifications at any later time.

10.4.10 409 Conflict

The request could not be completed due to a conflict with the current state of the resource. This code is only allowed in situations where it is expected that the user might be able to resolve the conflict and resubmit the request. The response body SHOULD include enough
information for the user to recognize the source of the conflict. Ideally, the response entity would include enough information for the user or user agent to fix the problem; however, that might not be possible and is not required.
Conflicts are most likely to occur in response to a PUT request. For example, if versioning were being used and the entity being PUT included changes to a resource which conflict with those made by an earlier (third-party) request, the server might use the 409 response to indicate that it can't complete the request. In this case, the response entity would likely contain a list of the differences between the two versions in a format defined by the response Content-Type.

10.4.11 410 Gone

The requested resource is no longer available at the server and no forwarding address is known. This condition is expected to be considered permanent. Clients with link editing capabilities SHOULD delete references to the Request-URI after user approval. If the server does not know, or has no facility to determine, whether or not the condition is permanent, the status code 404 (Not Found) SHOULD be used instead. This response is cacheable unless indicated otherwise.
The 410 response is primarily intended to assist the task of web maintenance by notifying the recipient that the resource is intentionally unavailable and that the server owners desire that remote links to that resource be removed. Such an event is common for limited-time, promotional services and for resources belonging to individuals no longer working at the server's site. It is not necessary to mark all permanently unavailable resources as "gone" or to keep the mark for any length of time -- that is left to the discretion of the server owner.

10.4.12 411 Length Required

The server refuses to accept the request without a defined Content- Length. The client MAY repeat the request if it adds a valid Content-Length header field containing the length of the message-body in the request message.

10.4.13 412 Precondition Failed

The precondition given in one or more of the request-header fields evaluated to false when it was tested on the server. This response code allows the client to place preconditions on the current resource metainformation (header field data) and thus prevent the requested method from being applied to a resource other than the one intended.

10.4.14 413 Request Entity Too Large

The server is refusing to process a request because the request entity is larger than the server is willing or able to process. The server MAY close the connection to prevent the client from continuing the request.
If the condition is temporary, the server SHOULD include a Retry- After header field to indicate that it is temporary and after what time the client MAY try again.

10.4.15 414 Request-URI Too Long

The server is refusing to service the request because the Request-URI is longer than the server is willing to interpret. This rare condition is only likely to occur when a client has improperly converted a POST request to a GET request with long query information, when the client has descended into a URI "black hole" of redirection (e.g., a redirected URI prefix that points to a suffix of itself), or when the server is under attack by a client attempting to exploit security holes present in some servers using fixed-length buffers for reading or manipulating the Request-URI.

10.4.16 415 Unsupported Media Type

The server is refusing to service the request because the entity of the request is in a format not supported by the requested resource for the requested method.

10.4.17 416 Requested Range Not Satisfiable

A server SHOULD return a response with this status code if a request included a Range request-header field (section 14.35), and none of the range-specifier values in this field overlap the current extent of the selected resource, and the request did not include an If-Range request-header field. (For byte-ranges, this means that the first- byte-pos of all of the byte-range-spec values were greater than the current length of the selected resource.)
When this status code is returned for a byte-range request, the response SHOULD include a Content-Range entity-header field specifying the current length of the selected resource (see section 14.16). This response MUST NOT use the multipart/byteranges content- type.

10.4.18 417 Expectation Failed

The expectation given in an Expect request-header field (see section 14.20) could not be met by this server, or, if the server is a proxy, the server has unambiguous evidence that the request could not be met by the next-hop server.

10.5 Server Error 5xx

Response status codes beginning with the digit "5" indicate cases in which the server is aware that it has erred or is incapable of performing the request. Except when responding to a HEAD request, the server SHOULD include an entity containing an explanation of the error situation, and whether it is a temporary or permanent condition. User agents SHOULD display any included entity to the user. These response codes are applicable to any request method.

10.5.1 500 Internal Server Error

The server encountered an unexpected condition which prevented it from fulfilling the request.

10.5.2 501 Not Implemented

The server does not support the functionality required to fulfill the request. This is the appropriate response when the server does not recognize the request method and is not capable of supporting it for any resource.

10.5.3 502 Bad Gateway

The server, while acting as a gateway or proxy, received an invalid response from the upstream server it accessed in attempting to fulfill the request.

10.5.4 503 Service Unavailable

The server is currently unable to handle the request due to a temporary overloading or maintenance of the server. The implication is that this is a temporary condition which will be alleviated after some delay. If known, the length of the delay MAY be indicated in a Retry-After header. If no Retry-After is given, the client SHOULD handle the response as it would for a 500 response.
      Note: The existence of the 503 status code does not imply that a
      server must use it when becoming overloaded. Some servers may wish
      to simply refuse the connection.

10.5.5 504 Gateway Timeout

The server, while acting as a gateway or proxy, did not receive a timely response from the upstream server specified by the URI (e.g. HTTP, FTP, LDAP) or some other auxiliary server (e.g. DNS) it needed to access in attempting to complete the request.
      Note: Note to implementors: some deployed proxies are known to
      return 400 or 500 when DNS lookups time out.

10.5.6 505 HTTP Version Not Supported

The server does not support, or refuses to support, the HTTP protocol version that was used in the request message. The server is indicating that it is unable or unwilling to complete the request using the same major version as the client, as described in section 3.1, other than with this error message. The response SHOULD contain an entity describing why that version is not supported and what other protocols are supported by that server.

Source: W3.ORG

What are Response Codes?


What are Response Codes?

When a search engine or website visitor makes a request to a web server, a three digit HTTP Response Status Code is returned. This code indicates what is about to happen. A response code of 200 means "OK, here is the content you were asking for." A 301 says, "Gotcha. That page has moved, so I'll send you there now." And so on.

Einstein once said, "If you can't explain it simply, you don't know it well enough."


200 OK

A 200 is the most common type of response code, and the one we experience most of the time when browsing the web. We asked to see a web page, and it was presented to us without any trouble.

301 Moved Permanently

We were expecting to find a web page in a particular location, but it has been moved. No worries though, the web server has sent us to the new location. Most users won't notice that this has happened unless they watch the URL change.

302 Found (Moved Temporarily)

You're in the right place, but the page has moved temporarily to a new location. Just like a 301 the user doesn't usually notice anything because the web server seemlessly moves them to the new URL.

Important SEO Implication: A 302 isn't a permanent move. Any SEO strength that the original page had won't be granted to the new URL.

401 Unauthorized

We've requested a page, but a username and password are required to access it. We're presented with a way to login.

Important SEO Implication: Search engines won't submit a username and password for entry. If you have content hidden behind a login, it won't show up in the search results.

403 Forbidden

We've requested a page that we don't have permission to access at all. This page isn't for us.

404 Not Found

We've requested a page, but the web server doesn't recognize our request. The page can't be shown because the server doesn't know what it is.

Important SEO Implication: Most default 404 pages are a dead end for users and search engines. Look at using a custom 404 for these cases.

410 Gone

We've requested a page and the web server knows what we're asking for, but the page is gone.

Important SEO Implication: There is some debate in the SEO world as to the advantage (if any) of using a 410 over a 404 in certain cases.

Most SEOs prefer to use a 410 when removing unfavorable (perhaps penalized) content from a website. Perhaps the website has some bad links pointing to a bad neighborhood within an otherwise quality site. Its better to use a 410 to say, "We know what you're asking for, but we've deliberately removed it from the site, permanently."

500 Internal Server Error

We've requested a page, and in return, we get a generic error message. No information is given. It is like looking a sales associate in the eye, asking a question, and recieving a blank stare in return.

503 Service Unavailable

We asked for a page, but are told that it is temporarily unavailable. Something is wrong. Perhaps the website is down for maintenance.

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

'V'Care is back with another Event Colors 2012

‘V’ Care is a voluntary organization, initiated with a motive to help the needy, in every facet probable. Shoring up other aid organizations, working with the same objects, as ours, is our main undertaking. We endeavor to abolish child labor, support HIV affected children, promote girls education, and aid the specially abled and the needy orphans

We would be celebrating our 3rd anniversary “COLORS” on the 26th of May , 2012 at Hari Hara Kala Bhavan, Hyderabad. We would be selling tickets and appeal for funds from different organizations, institutions, companies and individuals.

Participants:

1. Shri Kala Krishna: He is none other than the legendary dancing maestro of Andhra Natyam. He is one of the senior most disciples of Guru Nataraja Ramakrishna under whom he specialised in Kuchipudi dance, Andhra Natyam and other Temple dance traditions of Andhra. He is popularly known as Abhianava Satyabhama!



2. 
Mahesh: All the dancers dance with their legs. But Mahesh dances... without his legs... and in the air... taking your breath away! Mahesh is trained under the guidance of popular choreographer, Lawrence.






3. Fusion Music: Ever heard of fusion music weaving a magic on you and me? Watch Out! Our little kids are going to cast a magical spell on us with their fusion music.




4. 
Puppet Show: Puppet Show or Tholu Bommalaata is a beautiful art form. The dolls come alive on screen and tell their stories moving you to tears. They make you laugh and cry. Watch Out for this beautiful extraordinaire show on COLORS.









5. Professional singers from Telugu film industry will perform heart rendering songs.


Each ticket you buy will be counted as Donation. Ticket Denominations are 100, 200, 500, 1000 ... More Details and to Buy tickets please visit MeraEvents.


Thursday, April 26, 2012

Monday, April 16, 2012

What are keyword matching options?



The four keyword matching options determine which Google searches can trigger your ads to appear. These options can help you control who sees your ads.
You can set each search-targeted keyword to have one of those four settings. To use a keyword matching option, just add the appropriate punctuation to your keyword:
  1. Broad match: keyword
    Allows your ad to show on similar phrases and relevant variations
    (The broad match modifier may also be used to further refine your broad keyword matches: +keyword.)

  2. Phrase match: "keyword"
    Allows your ad to show for searches that match the exact phrase

  3. Exact match: [keyword]
    Allows your ad to show for searches that match the exact phrase exclusively

  4. Negative match: -keyword
    Ensures your ad doesn't show for any search that includes that term
With some options, you'll enjoy more ad impressions, clicks, and conversions; with others, you'll get fewer impressions and more narrow targeting. By applying the appropriate matching options to your keywords, you can best meet your ROI goals.

Broad Match

This is the default option. If your ad group contained the keyword 'tennis shoes,' your ad would be eligible to appear when a user's search term contained either or both words ('tennis' and 'shoes') in any order, and possibly along with other terms. Your ads could also show for singular/plural forms, synonyms, and other relevant variations.
Broad match keyword:Ads may show on searches for:
tennis shoestennis
shoes
buy tennis shoes
tennis shoe photos
running shoes
tennis sneakers
Run a search term report to see what keyword variations trigger your ad. The Inside AdWords blog also contains more information on how broad match can help you reach more customers.
Use the broad match modifier to have greater reach with your keywords than phrase match, and more control than broad match.

Phrase Match

If you enter your keyword in quotation marks, as in "tennis shoes," your ad would be eligible to appear when a user searches on the phrase tennis shoes, with the words in that order. It can also appear for searches that contain other terms as long as it includes the exact phrase you've specified.
Phrase match keyword:Ads may show on searches for:Ads won't show on searches for:
"tennis shoes"red tennis shoes
buy tennis shoes
tennis shoes photo
shoes for tennis
tennis shoe
tennis sneakers
Phrase match is more targeted than broad match, but more flexible than exact match.

Exact Match

If you surround your keywords in brackets -- such as [tennis shoes] -- your ad would be eligible to appear when a user searches for the specific phrase 'tennis shoes,' in this order, and without any other words in the search term.
Exact match keyword:Ads may show on searches for:Ads won't show on searches for:
[tennis shoes]tennis shoesred tennis shoes
tennis shoe
buy tennis shoes
You likely won't receive as many impressions, clicks, or conversions with exact match as you would with broad match. However, if you've carefully constructed a comprehensive keyword list, the traffic you do receive may be more targeted to your product or service.

Negative Match

If your keyword is 'tennis shoes' and you add the negative keyword '-used,' your ad will not appear for any searches that contain the word 'used.'
Keywords:Ads may show on searches for:Ads won't show on searches for:
tennis shoes
-used
tennis shoes
buy tennis shoes
tennis
used tennis shoes
shoe used for tennis 
Negative keywords are especially useful if your account contains lots of broad match keywords. It's a good idea to add any irrelevant keyword variations you see in a search term report or the Keyword Tool as a negative keyword.